Hard Times: Leadership in America

“Hard Times is a brilliantly insightful and immensely important book. It’s a tour de force-a passionate, provocative, and persuasive discourse on the extraordinarily complex context that confronts leaders in every waking moment. There is no one better able to tell this story than Kellerman. She is an exceptional writer with an extraordinary breadth and depth of knowledge who never hesitates to tell it like it is. Hard Times is one of those rare books that comes along every so often that gets you to stand up straight and pay attention. Bold, brawny, and sometimes disquieting, it is an essential guide to orienting in these uncertain times. Every leader and student of leadership must read this book. Now!”

– James Kouzes, coauthor, The Leadership Challenge, and the Dean’s Executive Fellow of Leadership, Leavey School of Business, Santa Clara University.

The End of Leadership

Becoming a leader has become a mantra. The explosive growth of the “leadership industry” is based on the belief that leading is a path to power and money, a medium for achievement, and a mechanism for creating change. But there are other, parallel, truths: that leaders of every stripe are in disrepute; that the tireless and often superficial teaching of leadership has brought us no closer to nirvana; and that followers nearly everywhere have become, on the one hand, disappointed and disillusioned and, on the other, entitled and emboldened. The End of Leadership takes on this unsettling situation. Buy this book.

Coming September 2014: Hard Times

“Hard Times is a brilliantly insightful and immensely important book. It’s a tour de force-a passionate, provocative, and persuasive discourse on the extraordinarily complex context that confronts leaders in every waking moment. There is no one better able to tell this story than Kellerman. She is an exceptional writer with an extraordinary breadth and depth of knowledge who never hesitates to tell it like it is. Hard Times is one of those rare books that comes along every so often that gets you to stand up straight and pay attention. Bold, brawny, and sometimes disquieting, it is an essential guide to orienting in these uncertain times. Every leader and student of leadership must read this book. Now!”

– James Kouzes, coauthor, The Leadership Challenge, and the Dean’s Executive Fellow of Leadership, Leavey School of Business, Santa Clara University

Available September 2014

Leadership: Essential Selections on Power, Authority, and Influence

Leadership: Essential Selections on Power, Authority, and Influence consists of the leadership classics as the word “classic” has come to be used. Every selection is about leadership, or is, of itself, an act of leadership. Every selection has literary value, not always, necessarily, aesthetic

Authors in value, but always, necessarily, value in language as leadership. Every selection is seminal: it changed forever what we thought and, or what we did. And every selection is universal – to be appreciated anywhere by any one, so long as they have an interest in leadership.

Each selection is preceded by an introduction, and each is succeeded by commentary and analysis, provided by the editor, Barbara Kellerman.mer, Elizabeth I, Truth and Lincoln, Lenin, Gandhi, Churchill, Mandela, and Havel.

To read this book is to become – leadership literate. Buy this book.

Followership: How Followers Are Creating Change and Changing Leaders

There is no leader without at least one follower – that’s obvious. But this groundbreaking volume is the first to provide a sweeping view of followers both in their own right – and in relation to their leaders. It deliberately departs from the leader-centric approach that has for too long dominated our thinking about leadership and management.

Followership enables us to see how people with relatively fewer sources of power, authority, and influence matter. They matter when they do something – and they matter even when they do little or nothing. In these rapidly changing times, and as Kellerman makes crystal clear, to fixate on leaders at the expense of followers is to do so at our peril. The latter are every bit as important as the former – which makes this book required reading for superiors and subordinates alike. Buy this book.

Women & Leadership: The State of Play and Strategies for Change

Despite recent progress, women seeking leadership positions face persistent and pervasive barriers. These include gender bias in leadership opportunities, gender inequalities in family responsibilities, inflexibilities in workplace structures, and inadequacies in social polices.

Women and Leadership brings together in one comprehensive volume preeminent scholars from a range of disciplines to address the challenges involving women and leadership. These experts explore when and how women exercise power and what stands in their way. This groundbreaking volume offers readers an informed analysis of the state of women and leadership.

“This book provides the most comprehensive account to date of women’s persistent underrepresentation in leadership roles, why it matters, and what can be done to change it.” —From the Foreword by Justice Sandra Day O’Connor (Ret.)

Buy this book.

Bad Leadership: What It Is, How It Happens, Why It Matters

Bad Leadership argues that it’s time to embrace a more honest, holistic view of leadership that acknowledges the dark side of human nature and its impact on leaders and followers alike. In a provocative departure from conventional thinking, Barbara Kellerman contends that bad leadership is not an aberration, but a ubiquitous and insidious part of everyday life that must be carefully examined and better understood.

Caring and counterintuitive, Bad Leadership underscores that leadership is a shared responsibility no one can ignore. By forcing us to examine, and thereby to understand, leadership’s dark side, Kellerman illuminates the ways that all of us can become better leaders and followers. Buy this book.

Reinventing Leadership

In a striking departure from past practices, Barbara Kellerman explores the fact that although we persist in viewing political and business leadership separately, the similarities between them far outweigh the differences. Kellerman claims that thinking of government and corporate leaders as a breed apart contributes to the dysfunctional gap between them, and she argues that in order to tackle those political, economic, and social problems that are the most intractable, political and business leaders will have no choice but to work together.